Category Archives: Home Safety

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Danger of CSST

¬¬¬¬There has been a good deal of concern lately about a material called CSST. The letters stand for Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing. The name accurately describes what it is, but its use for natural gas (or propane) lines in your home may not be so obvious.

Gas is traditionally piped through the house with ‘black pipe.’ This is a steel pipe that is not galvanized and must be threaded to accommodate junctions and elbows. The threading is an arduous time consuming process done on the job site.

CSST was developed to be flexible and can be run to appliances throughout the house without multiple threaded junctions. Ends are terminated with suitable threaded connectors that are easily installed. The product greatly simplifies gas plumbing in new homes.

The ‘danger’ occurs when lightning energizes a CSST line and arcs to an adjacent grounded metal surface. The arc readily punctures the thin walls of the CSST and ignites the gas now leaking out of the puncture.

Bear in mind that direct lightning strikes can severely damage a home with or without CSST. Certain geographical areas of the US are more prone to lightning storms, and seasonal prevalence of lightning varies across the country.

Proper installation of CSST requires ‘bonding’ (create an electrical path) the CSST to the homes electrical ground. The intended purpose of bonding is to prevent the CSST from becoming the lightnings electrical path by diverting the energy to ground.

Maryland law requires a statement in a home inspection report to suggest that only a licensed Master Electrician can verify a properly bonded CSST system.

While this is certainly good advice, it bears mentioning that proven fires caused by CSST represent a fraction of one percent of all the current installations. To date no class action lawsuits against CSST manufacturers have been successful in proving their case.

One reputable law firm on the internet advises that, “Since August 2011, it has been reported that at least 140 fires involving lightning and CSST have occurred across the United States.” Continued reading on this site reveals that there are more than six million homes across the United States that are equipped with CSST. You do the math.

There is no question that CSST should be properly installed and bonded, but don’t let its presence scare you away from a perfectly good home.

Independent Home Inspection 410-504-3751

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Carbon Monoxide in your home?

Many of us are familiar with the poisonous fumes of automobile exhaust as carbon monoxide. One carbon atom joined to one oxygen atom its molecular abbreviation is easily recognized as the letters CO.

Now before we go too far it’s important to recognize that CO is a colorless, odorless gas. Completely invisible it is not to be confused with the visible water vapor or oil smoke associated with car exhaust. Just as important is the fact that CO is a byproduct of incomplete combustion. Any combustion, so this includes any fuel burning device or appliance in your home.

Fuels that are most often burned inside the home are heating oil, natural gas, propane, wood, and some years ago coal.

The most obvious appliance to burn any fuel is the home furnace or boiler and if you heat your home with wood then a wood stove or fireplace. Gas cooking ranges and ovens can be fueled either by natural gas or propane as can be your water heater which might alternately be fueled by oil.

Did you know that your gas dryer’s combustion exhaust is vented through the same four inch duct as the moist air? It is essential here to use a metal foil duct.

For the most part all of these devices are vented through a chimney in some way to the outdoors. A negative pressure in the home or an equipment malfunction (flue damage) can occur which does not allow the combustion gasses from these appliances to vent properly. Should this happen a working CO detector can save your families’ life.

The place to put your CO detector is in the hallway outside the bedrooms or one in each bedroom. Yes, I know the furnace is not in your bedroom, but the time when you are most susceptible to CO poisoning will be when you are asleep. While you are asleep your air handler will distribute the CO, should any occur, to the various bedrooms. This might happen in either a heating or cooling situation, you will want the earliest possible alarm so you can move your family to fresh air (outside) and call someone to correct the problem.

Take a moment this evening to consider your homes fuel burning appliances. Install a CO detector, readily available at all the lumber outlets, outside of the sleeping areas for your families’ protection.

Visit me at: http://www.IndependentHomeInspectionMD.com for more information on this and other safety items in the home.

Water Heaters

We expect hot water when we turn the tap handle and have become so accustomed to it that we rarely think about it. In essence it is just another convenience readily taken for granted.

Many of us have seen a recent television commercial depicting a water heater explosion. Although humorous in content and oriented towards loss recovery rather than prevention few of us have considered the real threat of a water heater explosion. It does happen!

The physics of such an event are easy enough to understand. When water is heated it expands. When it is contained pressure increases proportionately with heat. When pressure exceeds the containment vessel ratings; BOOM!

The optimum temperature of a water heater is 120 degrees. This temperature has been tested and recommended to prevent scalding. When properly adjusted a water heater will regulate the heating element to maintain this desired temperature. Note: Water heaters that supply home heat may have higher temperatures and should be supplied with tempering valves to prevent scalding at fixtures.

The first clue you may have to a water heater problem may be a noticeable increase in the temperature of the water. A higher temperature means higher water pressure inside the water heater tank and should be corrected.

An essential safety component of your water heater is the temperature pressure relief valve (TPR). Located at the top of your water heater, where the water is hottest, it is designed to release the hot water in the event that the temperature or pressure exceeds a predetermined safe level (typically 150 psi and 210 degrees F). Proper installation requires that the TPR discharge be directed through a pipe toward the floor and no more than 6 inches from the floor to prevent hazardous discharge.

By now you can see that a number of things must happen together to create an explosion. This can and does happen however, and your awareness should give you a new understanding of the need for qualified service when problems arise.

Independent Home Inspection examines water heater components, age and installation during your Home Inspection. Call for more information. 410-504-3751

visit me at http://www.IndependentHomeInspectionMD.com